This Day in History

The Fashoda Incident (1898)
Toward the end of the 19th century, France and Britain were brought to the brink of war by territorial disputes in Africa. Tensions came to a head at a strategically located fort at Fashoda, Sudan, occupied by the French mere months before a British force arrived with its own designs on the area. A standoff ensued, but the French, fearing an outbreak of hostilities, eventually withdrew. The diplomatic solution to this political crisis is widely seen as a precursor to what Anglo-French agreement? Discuss

"Is Paul McCartney Dead?" (1969)
If one is to believe the rumors, the real Paul McCartney died at the height of Beatlemania and was secretly replaced by a double. The precise origins of this urban legend are unknown, but it gained traction at around the time that the band was breaking up. This is attributed in part to an article published in an Iowa university student newspaper addressing the rumors and pointing to supposed clues in the band's music and album artwork that alluded to the rocker's death. What are some examples?

The Grito de Dolores: Battle Cry of Mexican War of Independence (1810)
The revolutionary movements in the US and France did not go unnoticed in Mexico, which had been subjugated by Spain centuries earlier. When Napoleon invaded Spain in 1808, many Mexicans saw an opportunity to claim their own freedom. In 1810, revolutionary priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla launched the Mexican War of Independence with his Grito de Dolores—"Cry of Dolores"—a call to freedom that roused the peasants to action and became their battle cry. How is the event commemorated today?