Einstein's 'God Letter' breaks record, fetches nearly $3 million
A handwritten letter in which Nobel physicist Albert Einstein took issue with the concept of religion and his own Jewish faith was sold for $2,892,500 at auction in New York. Roselle Chen reports.

First 3D-printed motorbike unveiled
German firm BigRep says it's produced the first fully functioning motorbike make using a 3D printer.

Berlin zoo fighting to keep baby polar cub alive
Three days ago polar bear Tonja gave birth to a new cub at the Tierpark Berlin zoo. But with infection a risk, zoo staff is placing the baby under special care. Dan Fastenberg reports.

New York department stores get into the holiday spirit
Retailers use their store windows to spread holiday cheer in unique ways. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

The Grinch fools around at sparkly Austrian Christmas house
More than half a million lightbulbs dazzle visitors at Sabine Gollnhuber's festive house, with the largest number of inflatable Christmas figures in Europe. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Catching songbirds at Gaza airport
A 16-year-old Gazan who quit school at the age of nine because his father could not afford the costs of living for a family of 14 has turned into a bird catcher. Every day, Hamza Abu Shalhoub sets his net to catch the birds he then sells to buy food.

Sculpture made with 100,000 confiscated blades highlights UK knife crime
A sculpture made of 100,000 seized blades went on display in the English city of Liverpool on Thursday, paying tribute to those whose lives have been affected by knife crime. Rough cut (No reporter narration).

Christmas comes to Windsor Castle
Christmas has arrived at Windsor Castle, with two glittering trees on display for visitors inside the castle and one tree outside the castle. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

All aboard to the Holiday Train Show at the New York Botanical Garden
Vistors are on schedule for a fantastical ride through New York City. (Rough Cut) No Reporter Narration

Babylon's long-dead tongue revived for film
Archaeology students at the University of Cambridge have made the first ever film in ancient Babylonian; a tale of revenge that was found on a Mesopotamian tablet.

This Day in History

Imperial Japanese Navy Sinks Two British Warships (1941)
Japanese aggression in late 1941 prompted Britain to send two of their largest warships—HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse—to the Pacific as a deterrent. However, war in the Pacific escalated with the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7. Three days later, Japanese forces destroyed the Prince of Wales and Repulse near Singapore. The warships were the first sunk by aircraft while at sea. How did British Prime Minister Winston Churchill react to the sinkings? Discuss

The Subsequent Nuremberg Trials: Doctors' Trial Begins (1946)
The Doctors' Trial was the first of 12 post-World War II trials collectively called the "Subsequent Nuremberg Trials," which the US held in its occupation zone in Nuremberg, Germany. Of the 23 defendants, 20 were medical doctors, and they faced charges for war crimes that included experimenting on human subjects without their consent. The Nuremberg Code was thus established to protect the rights of humans participating in medical research. How many of the defendants received death sentences?

Shooter Opens Fire at Damageplan Concert, Killing Four (2004)
Not long after American heavy metal band Pantera disbanded and two of its founding members, brothers "Dimebag" Darrell and Vinnie Paul Abbott, formed the band Damageplan, the group released its debut album. Sadly, it would also be its last. During a concert in Columbus, Ohio, later that year, former US Marine Nathan Gale went on a shooting rampage, killing Darrell along with a fan, a roadie, and a security guard before being fatally shot by a police officer. Why did Gale do it?